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(Image Courtesy of Associated Press)

Keith Thurman did as he said he would in the early part of the fight at the Barclays Center in New York, New York, getting right in Garcia’s wheelhouse from the outset and out-slugging him. Garcia seemed to be thrown off by the strategy and struggled to catch-and-counter like he has done so often before. Thurman managed to hurt Garcia, as well, but was never that close to putting on the finishing touches.

“One Time” maintained this strategy for a good three rounds before reverting to a more stick-and-move posture. This, too, proved more than Garcia could handle, as “Swift” was ineffective at cutting off the ring and his body shots took little toll on Thurman’s lateral movement. Some of these shots strayed a bit south of the border and Garcia received a few warnings.

The Philadelphia-based Garcia kept up his ways through the midway point of the fight, where rounds looked closer, but which most still saw Thurman as dictating the pace and territory.

As the segments ticked away, Thurman and his corner were all but at ease with the situation, while Angel Garcia was undoubtedly worried, urging his son to do more. By the time the 12th had started, most had the Floridian as a clear victor. That didn’t change after Thurman boxed well once more and knew full well that he had added another quality scalp to his resume.

Of course in boxing as usual, controversy must permeate the event. Everybody held their breath when it was announced that a split decision would be rendered, especially with Danny Garcia’s track record of getting close ones. Kevin Morgan, a judge who most don’t believe saw the fight, scored it in Garcia’s favor, seven rounds to five. Thankfully he was overruled and order was restored.

Thurman was gracious in his post-fight interview and didn’t make too much of the poor decision by Morgan, saying, “I thought it was a clear victory, but Danny came to fight. I knew when it was split and I had that wide spread, I knew that it had to go to me.”

He can now move on to bigger things. A fight with the Brook-Spence winner is a must. The quicker we establish a new, undisputed championship line, the better.

 

Undercard

Jorge Cota figured out the difference between Yudel Johnson, a man who didn’t maximize his potential, and Erickson Lubin, someone who seems posed to do big things in the sport.

The fight started tentatively, with both men content feeling each other out. It became more of that kind of fight when Cota switched from orthodox to southpaw. Lubin seemed less comfortable game planning against that style and took a while to figure it out.

As the bout rolled into the third round, the former amateur standout began to become more accurate with his left hand, which started to trouble the Mexican. Lubin proceeded to bait Cota into unloading by dipping low with his hands set at his side and then let loose a fantastic overhand left which put Cota down for nearly the count. By the time Cota arose, the ref saw what we all did and waived it off, preventing a needless post-knockdown beat down.

Lubin has a high ceiling from any modest viewing of the bout. The sooner he gets a title nod, the better.

Chad Dawson’s career is all but over at the world level now, as if Karpency didn’t reassure us of that.

Andrzej Fonfara, while down on the scorecards, got all over Dawson like white on rice and halted Dawson in the 10th and final round of their crossroads contest.